Saturday, 28 February 2015

Friday, 27 February 2015

Feel The Presence of Nature...


“The strange white world lay stroked by silence. No birds sang. The garden was no longer there, in this forested land. Nor were the out-buildings nor the old crumbling walls. There lay only a narrow clearing round the house now, hummocked with unbroken snowdrifts, before the trees began, with a narrow path leading away.” 

Thursday, 26 February 2015

Indian Tradition...


India is the birthplace of Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism and Sikhism, collectively known as Indian religions. Indian religions are a major form of world religions along with Abrahamic ones. Today, Hinduism and Buddhism are the world's third and fourth-largest religions respectively, with over 2 billion followers altogether, and possibly as many as 2.5 or 2.6 billion followers.
India is one of the most religiously diverse nations in the world, with some of the most deeply religious societies and cultures. Religion plays a central and definitive role in the life of many of its people.

According to a 2001 census of India, the religion of 80% of the people is Hinduism. Islam is practised by around 13% of all Indians.The country had over 23 million Christians, over 19 million Sikhs, about 8 million Buddhists and about 4 million Jains.
Sikhism, Jainism and especially Buddhism are influential not only in India but across the world. Christianity, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, and the Bahá'í Faith are also influential but their numbers are smaller. Atheism and agnostics also have visible influence in India, along with a self-ascribed tolerance to other people.

The Hindu religion has many schools, each with their own unique views. For example, according to Yogavasistha, a spiritual text of the Advaita school of Hindu religion, the values of the liberated (Hindi: जीवन्मुक्ति), self-actualised human being, may be summarised as follows: "Pleasures do not delight him; pains do not distress. Although engaged in worldly actions, he has no attachment to any object. He is busy outwardly, yet calm inwardly. He feels free from restrictions of scriptures, customs, age, caste or creed. He is happy, but his happiness does not depend on anything else. He does not feel needy, proud, agitated, troubled, depressed or elated. He is full of compassion and forgiveness even to those who mean him harm. He does the right thing, regardless of the pressures. He is patient, perseverant, and without any impurity in his heart. He is free of delusions, he does not crave for anything. His sense of freedom comes from his spirit of inquiry. The fruits of his inquiry are his strength, intellect, efficiency and punctuality. He keeps company of wise and enlightened persons. He is content."

There is significant historical discourse in India on the notion, relevance, and the existence and non-existence of God. Dharmakirti, for example, in the 7th century wrote in Pramanavarttikam:

वेद प्रामाण्यं कस्य चित् कर्तृवादः स्नाने धर्मेच्छा जातिवादाव लेपः|
संतापारंभः पापहानाय चेति ध्वस्तप्रज्ञानां पञ्च लिङगानि जाड्ये||

Believing that the Veda are standard (holy or divine), believing in a Creator for the world,
           Bathing in holy waters for gaining punya, having pride (vanity) about one's job function,

           Performing penance to absolve sins,Are the five symptoms of having lost one's sanity.

Wednesday, 25 February 2015

Feel The Presence of Nature...


“Is there not glory enough in living the days given to us? You should know there is adventure in simply being among those we love and the things we love, and beauty too.” 

Tuesday, 24 February 2015

Feel The Presence of Nature...


“The graceful wings of a dove lead to the endless imagination in a dream wings of pain.” 

Monday, 23 February 2015

Feel The Presence of Nature...


“A person who remains attached to his roots with his foot always on the ground grows like a green tree that bears the best fruit.” 

Sunday, 22 February 2015

" Save Energy "


Energy conservation refers to reducing energy consumption through using less of an energy service. Energy conservation differs from efficient energy use, which refers to using less energy for a constant service. 

For example, driving less is an example of energy conservation. Driving the same amount with a higher mileage vehicle is an example of energy efficiency. Energy conservation and efficiency are both energy reduction techniques

Even though energy conservation reduces energy services, it can result in increased environmental quality, national security, personal financial security and higher savings. It is at the top of the sustainable energy hierarchy.[citation needed] It also lowers energy costs by preventing future resource depletion.

Saturday, 21 February 2015

" End Poverty "



In the book, Sachs argues that extreme poverty—defined by the World Bank as incomes of less than one dollar per day—can be eliminated globally by the year 2025, through carefully planned development aid. 

He presents the problem as an inability of very poor countries to reach the "bottom rung" of the ladder of economic development; once the bottom rung is reached, a country can pull itself up into the global market economy, and the need for outside aid will be greatly diminished or eliminated.

In order to address and remedy the specific economic stumbling blocks of various countries, Sachs espouses the use of what he terms "clinical economics", by analogy to medicine. Sachs explains that countries, like patients, are complex systems, requiring differential diagnosis, an understanding of context, monitoring and evaluation, and professional standards of ethics.

Clinical economics requires a methodic analysis and "differential kapay" of a country's economic problems, followed by a specifically tailored prescription. Many factors can affect a country's ability to enter the world market, including government corruption; legal and social disparities based on gender, ethnicity, or caste; diseases such as AIDS and malaria; lack of infrastructure (including transportation, communications, health, and trade); unstable political landscapes; protectionism; and geographic barriers. Sachs discusses each factor, and its potential remedies, in turn.

In order to illustrate the use of clinical economics, Sachs presents case studies on Bolivia, Poland, and Russia, and discusses the solutions he presented to those countries, and their effects. The book also discusses the economies of Malawi, India, China, and Bangladesh as representative of various stages of economic development.

Friday, 20 February 2015

Feel The Presence of Nature...


“I’ve often thought of the forest as a living cathedral, but this might diminish what it truly is. If I have understood Koyukon teachings, the forest is not merely an expression or representation of sacredness, nor a place to invoke the sacred; the forest is sacredness itself. 

Nature is not merely created by God; nature is God. Whoever moves within the forest can partake directly of sacredness, experience sacredness with his entire body, breathe sacredness and contain it within himself, drink the sacred water as a living communion, bury his feet in sacredness, touch the living branch and feel the sacredness, open his eyes and witness the burning beauty of sacredness” 

Thursday, 19 February 2015

" Stop Child Labour "


Child labour is the practice of having children engage in economic activity, on part or full-time basis. The practice deprives children of their childhood, and is harmful to their physical and mental development. Poverty, lack of good schools and growth of informal economy are considered as the important causes of child labour in India.

The 1998 national census of India estimated the total number of child labour, aged 5–14, to be at 12.6 million, out of a total child population of 253 million in 5-14 age group. A 2009-2010 nationwide survey found child labour prevalence had reduced to 4.98 million children (or less than 2% of children in 5-14 age group). The 2011 national census of India found the total number of child labour, aged 5–14, to be at 4.35 million, and the total child population to be 259.64 million in that age group.[8] The child labour problem is not unique to India; worldwide, about 217 million children work, many full-time.

In 2001, an estimated 1% of all child workers, or about 120,000 children in India were in a hazardous job. UNICEF estimates that India with its larger population, has the highest number of labourers in the world under 14 years of age, while sub-saharan African countries have the highest percentage of children who are deployed as child labour. International Labour Organisation estimates that agriculture at 60 percent is the largest employer of child labour in the world, while United Nation's Food and Agriculture Organisation estimates 70% of child labour is deployed in agriculture and related activities. Outside of agriculture, child labour is observed in almost all informal sectors of the Indian economy.

Companies including Gap, Primark, Monsanto have been criticised for child labour in their products. The companies claim they have strict policies against selling products made by underage children, but there are many links in a supply chain making it difficult to oversee them all. In 2011, after three years of Primark's effort, BBC acknowledged that its award-winning investigative journalism report of Indian child labour use by Primark was a fake. BBC apologized to Primark, to Indian suppliers and all its viewers.

Article 24 of India's constitution prohibits child labour. Additionally, various laws and the Indian Penal Code, such as the Juvenile Justice (care and protection) of Children Act-2000, and the Child Labour (Prohibition and Abolition) Act-1986 provide a basis in law to identify, prosecute and stop child labour in India.

Wednesday, 18 February 2015

Feel The Presence of Nature...



“Is there not glory enough in living the days given to us? You should know there is adventure in simply being among those we love and the things we love, and beauty too.” 

Tuesday, 17 February 2015

Feel The Presence of Nature...


“A person who remains attached to his roots with his foot always on the ground grows like a green tree that bears the best fruit.” 

Monday, 16 February 2015

Feel The Presence of Nature...


“The graceful wings of a dove lead to the endless imagination in a dream wings of pain.” 

Sunday, 15 February 2015

Feel The Presence of Nature...



“There are reasons we congregate in these hot spots- to 

worship beauty and to feel its effects light up the 

electrolytes in the bloodstream."

Saturday, 14 February 2015

Feel The Presence of Nature...



“Your external appearance to can be great, but your stunning beauty beams from within.” 

Friday, 13 February 2015

Feel The Presence of Nature...




“From barren brown stems to glistening leaf-buds; from the leaf-buds to snowy virginity of bloom…It was like a flute song forgotten in another existence and remembered again. 

What? How? Why? This singing she heard that had nothing to do with her ears. The rose of the world was breathing out smell. It followed her through all her waking moments and caressed her in her sleep.”

Thursday, 12 February 2015

Never Give Up !!


video


Continuous exertion may sound very exhausting and thus, it is understandable even if some people suggest it should be better to give up sometimes. It is true at some points because the human race is not almighty creature. However I would say it is not about giving up, but just changing a goal.

 Recognizing life events as a sequence, I think even when giving up something, it is just adjusting the goal to more reachable level and processes for previous goals always play a role in reaching next goal.

In the first place, I would like to emphasize that this is not only about the youth becoming competent, but also about all the people making their own lives more comfortable and enjoyable. For instance, both following examples I present can be seen as continuous exertion: a young person trying to become a professional musician and a person on the verge of death exercising hands in order to move them better than the previous day. 

If their goals are too high for them, the young person may have to change it to be working in a related field such as becoming a commentator, a voice trainer or so, and the dying person may have to change it to exercise fingers instead of hands. That is, people naturally keep trying in any case until the last minute they accept death.

Furthermore, there are also two advantages of indomitable attitudes. Firstly, some different approaches to a goal are necessary, other than blind efforts. Such a contrivance activates brain and makes human beings more alive. I don’t think it is exaggerative to say. Secondly, this attitude is also important when trying to achieve something extraordinary, because chances and right ideas do not always lie all together. Other chances and ideas never show up if it is given up. Totally different idea or better chances sometimes appear after groping in the dark.


From what I have been discussing above, there is no doubt about favourable influences of continuous exertion. Whether agree or disagree with the statement of this topic, people keep trying by nature and it does make us alive. When I have no energy left trying, I simply keep it on my mind so as not to miss any possibilities. In other words, it is possible to keep trying even when feeling like giving up. Thus, I strongly believe that we should never give up.

Wednesday, 11 February 2015

Incredible India

video

India , officially the Republic of India (Bhārat Gaṇarājya) is a country in South Asia. It is the seventh-largest country by area, the second-most populous country with over 1.2 billion people, and the most populous democracy in the world. Bounded by the Indian Ocean on the south, the Arabian Sea on the south-west, and the Bay of Bengal on the south-east, it shares land borders with Pakistan to the west; China, Nepal, and Bhutan to the north-east; and Burma and Bangladesh to the east. In the Indian Ocean, India is in the vicinity of Sri Lanka and the Maldives; in addition, India's Andaman and Nicobar Islands share a maritime border with Thailand and Indonesia.

Home to the ancient Indus Valley Civilisation and a region of historic trade routes and vast empires, the Indian subcontinent was identified with its commercial and cultural wealth for much of its long history. 

Four religions—Hinduism, Buddhism, Jainism, and Sikhism—originated here, whereas Judaism, Zoroastrianism, Christianity, and Islam arrived in the 1st millennium CE and also helped shape the region's diverse culture. Gradually annexed by and brought under the administration of the British East India Company from the early 18th century and administered directly by the United Kingdom after Indian Rebellion of 1857, India became an independent nation in 1947 after a struggle for independence that was marked by non-violent resistance led by Mahatma Gandhi.

The Indian economy is the world's tenth-largest by nominal GDP and third-largest by purchasing power parity (PPP). Following market-based economic reforms in 1991, India became one of the fastest-growing major economies; it is considered a newly industrialised country. 

However, it continues to face the challenges of poverty, corruption, malnutrition, inadequate public healthcare, and terrorism. A nuclear weapons state and a regional power, it has the third-largest standing army in the world and ranks ninth in military expenditure among nations.

 India is a federal constitutional republic governed under a parliamentary system consisting of 29 states and 7 union territories. India is a pluralistic, multilingual, and a multi-ethnic society. It is also home to a diversity of wildlife in a variety of protected habitats.

Tuesday, 10 February 2015

Feel The Presence of Nature...



“The beauty of that June day was almost staggering.

 After the wet spring, everything that could turn green had outdone itself in greenness and everything that could even dream of blooming or blossoming was in bloom and blossom. 

The sunlight was a benediction. The breezes were so caressingly soft and intimate on the skin as to be embarrassing.” 

Monday, 9 February 2015

Feel The Presence of Nature...


“From barren brown stems to glistening leaf-buds; from the leaf-buds to snowy virginity of bloom…

It was like a flute song forgotten in another existence and remembered again. 


What? How? Why? This singing she heard that had nothing to do with her ears. The rose of the world was breathing out smell. 


It followed her through all her waking moments and caressed her in her sleep.” 

Sunday, 8 February 2015

Feel The Presence of Nature...


“Beauty doesn't have to be about anything. What's a vase about? 
What's a sunset or a flower about? 
What, for that matter, is Mozart's Twenty-third Piano Concerto about?” 

Saturday, 7 February 2015

Feel The Presence of Nature...


“If you suddenly and unexpectedly feel joy, don’t hesitate. Give in to it. There are plenty of lives and whole towns destroyed or about to be. We are not wise, and not very often kind. And much can never be redeemed. 

Still life has some possibility left. Perhaps this is its way of fighting back, that sometimes something happened better than all the riches or power in the world. 


It could be anything, but very likely you notice it in the instant when love begins. Anyway, that’s often the case. Anyway, whatever it is, don’t be afraid of its plenty. Joy is not made to be a crumb. (Don't Hesitate)”. 

Friday, 6 February 2015

Feel The Presence of Nature...


“Beauty is the purest feeling of the soul.
 Beauty arises when soul is satisfied.”